June 2022 Garden – a late start to planting

The garden season has officially arrived in Northern Ontario and I am super excited. While I did start many plants ahead of time, planting as early as late March. Doing this, allows me to plant good-sized seedlings as soon as the threat of frost has passed – which is generally mid-June. Several plants will also be directly sown during the month, as they don’t need that head start. Now that June has come and gone, it’s time to share how the June 2022 garden is looking and what changes were made this year.

This year has a lot of new features to the garden. A new garden space, along with a lot of new varieties of plants is adding some excitement. It’s always great to have a new space, even if it means a lot of upfront work, but a new space was overdue. With a new space comes the opportunity to try new varieties without taking away space for my usual plants. I don’t normally grow more than one experimental plant each year, however, this year I decided to go a little crazy with new varieties.

June 2022 Garden

The main garden

This is the biggest garden space I have to work with. It’s a mix of inground, raised beds, and containers. Doing this mix allows me to grow a nice variety of plants. This year I made some big changes to the main garden. Normally, I would grow several different plants within the raised bed, however, this year almost all of those beds are dedicated to tomatoes. Why? It’s simple, I had a number of older tomato seeds that I decided to plant and see if they would grow. Seeing as they were about 8 years old, I didn’t expect much. Well, wouldn’t you know it, nearly every seed sprouted. Instead of letting those plants go to waste, I decided to plant all of them. While this means that I don’t have space for potatoes, carrots, and a few other items I would normally plant in these beds, I figure it will be a worthy experiment to see how the tomatoes grow. However, this could backfire as tomatoes like the heat and we live in an area where summers are generally on the colder side.

Other than this major change, most of the garden is planted the same as usual. Beans are planted in the in-ground garden and they are starting to come in nicely. I did skip planting snap peas in favor of cucumbers along the fence, however, if I have time and depending on how the cucumbers do, I may put in a late planting of peas.

What’s growing in this space

Tomatoes

  • Beefsteak
  • Bonny Best
  • Tiny Tim
  • Roma VF
  • San Marzano Roma

Peppers

  • Purple Beauty
  • Bell Color Mix

Cucumbers

  • National Pickling
  • Sumter
  • Straight Eight

Zucchini

  • Dark Green

Beans

  • Golden Wax
  • Contender Green Bush

Herbs

  • Extra Curled Dwarf Parsley
  • Big Italy Parsley
  • Genovese Basil
  • Sweet Basil
  • Dill

Flowers

  • Marigolds
  • Velvet Queen Sunflowers
  • Dwarf Jewel Mixed Nasturtiums
  • Sunspot Dwarf Sunflower
  • Zebrina Malva

Leafy greens

  • King of Denmark Spinach
  • Grand Rapids Lettuce
  • Red Salad Bowl Lettuce
  • Fordhook Swiss Chard

Other

  • Cherry Belle Radishes
  • Garlic Chives

The new garden

After spending a good chunk of May creating this new space, removing sod, and adding soil and compost, it was time to get it all planted. Since this area is in the shade in the afternoon, I figured this would be the perfect place to plant all of the cool weather crops – those that prefer to be in partial shade. The secondary reason for this is that most first-year gardens don’t do that well, as the soil tends to lack all the nutrients it needs to keep a lot of plants going. Since brassicas and leafy greens don’t require heavy feeding, they are perfect to grow in this space this year.

This garden space is also affectionately known as ‘Plague’s Patch’ because almost everything grown in this garden can be eaten by our pet rabbit, Plague. However, these plants aren’t exclusively grown for her

What’s growing in this space

Leafy greens

  • King of Denmark Spinach
  • Bright Lights Swiss Chard
  • Grand Rapids Lettuce
  • Red Salad Bowl Lettuce
  • Double Choice Spinach
  • Fordhook Swiss Chard
  • Romaine Lettuce

Brassicas

  • Purple Cabbage
  • Sun King Broccoli
  • Spring Broccoli
  • Green Broccoli
  • Long Island Improved Brussel Sprouts
  • Dwarf Green Curled Kale
  • Romanesco Broccoli

Flowers

  • Marigolds
  • Dwarf Jewel Mixed Nasturtiums
  • Sunspot Dwarf Sunflower
  • Alaska Shasta Daisy
  • Zebrina Malva

Other

  • Cherry Belle Radishes

The front garden

I’ll be honest, I decided to not plant the front garden this year. The price of flowers was too high to bother with this small space. It’s not completely empty as the chocolate mint has taken over this space. I don’t mind one bit that most of this garden is chocolate mint since it smells fantastic. In the end, leaving this space to do what it likes will allow me to focus more on the vegetable gardens.

What’s left to do

While I have a ton planted already, there is still more to come. I may have overestimated how much space I had to work with as I have quite a few plants left but almost no space to work with. Most of what is left to plant are some herbs that were started late and needed a bit of extra time before transplanting. Otherwise, it’s simply extra plants such as tomatoes and a few flowers that I ran out of space in the in-ground and raised bed gardens.

I still need to add gravel to the paths in the new garden. I am currently pricing out my options to see where I can get the amount I need for the best price. So, hopefully, that will be done this month. At some point, I would also like to add a fence along the edge of this garden to prevent our dog from getting into it.

The solar lights also need to be added to the border of the gardens. While these aren’t absolutely necessary, I like the look of them, especially in the late evening.

Lastly, weeding will be a regular activity for the remainder of the garden season. Really, the only downside to having more garden space to grow with is it leads to more time spent weeding.

I hope you enjoyed my June 2022 garden update. What do you have growing in your garden?

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